Doctors often use Hematology tests or X-rays to find fractures. X-rays helps the doctor find breakage in continuity of the bones, while Hematology assists in spotting decreases in HCT and Hgb.

 

Once the doctor notes the medical condition, he/she will recommend medical supervision, nurse interventions, etc to treat the condition. Management often includes diets, exercise, etc, yet it depends on the type of fracture.

 

DO not try this at home unless your doctor has authorized treatment first.
Diet of any kind is ok, so many think, yet some people lack vitamins, minerals, etc, while others have high loads. The diet set up from fractures may include high protein diet, high vitamin, low calcium, and increases in fluids. It is amazing that a doctor would request low calcium diets, especially when calcium is essential for building bones, yet in some instances low volumes of calcium is mandatory.
Management may include elevation of the legs, especially if the patient has a hip fracture. Exercise includes ROM and isometric. Stretch exercises are best suited for back injuries.

 

Hip injuries can cause back pain. If doctors find fractures it could lead to complications, such as “pressure sores, “deep vein thrombosis,” avascular tissue death, or necrosis of the femoral top, renal (Kidney) lithiasis, hypovolemic shock, fat and pulmonary (Lungs) embolism, osteomyelitis, cubicle syndrome, urinary tract infection, and pneumonia.

 

Osteomyelitis, cubicle syndrome, and dead tissues, or avascular necrosis is clear indications that fractures are present. We’ve discussed fractures now let’s review the skeletal muscles to see how it relates to back pain.

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